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Why Stoves?

7 million people die each year from illness related to air pollution. This is 4x the number of people who died of AIDS in 2012 and 11x as many annual deaths as malaria.

Cookfires Worldwide

Poor Health

A fire in the kitchen, if you’re cooking a meal, produces about the same pollution per hour in a typical house as a thousand cigarettes burning.
Women and children in developing countries are exposed each day to pollution from cooking smoke, up to 20 times the level recommended by the World Health Organization. Cook fires in poorly ventilated homes cause more than 3 deaths per minute. Exposure to cooking smoke leads to low birth weight, childhood pneumonia, tuberculosis, and a number of chronic illnesses. Lower respiratory infections were the top cause of death in low-income countries in 2011 and are predicted to be the top cause of death in Africa by 2015.

Poverty

Families pay as much as a third of their income to purchase fuel for cooking.
Cooking over open fires imposes high financial costs on families, especially the very poor, whose incomes of less than 2 dollars a day must be stretched to cover basic necessities.

Environment

Cook fires cause deforestation and climate change.
Cook fires emit greenhouse gases laced with sunlight-absorbing black carbon, and hurry deforestation. Black carbon is the second greatest contributor to global warming, responsible for an estimated 18% of the Earth’s rising temperature.

Safety

Women and girls face assault as they forage for fuel in conflict zones.
Finding wood to cook meals is a daily struggle for many women around the world. Women and girls must walk many hours, several times a week, just to find a single tree with usable wood to fuel their fires. Outside the relative safety of refugee camps, they are vulnerable to acts of violence.

Clean cookstoves save lives, create economic opportunity and combat climate change.
See how…

Health

Planet

Poverty

Health, Planet, and Poverty Health, Planet, and Poverty Health, Planet, and Poverty

A fire in the kitchen, if you’re cooking a meal, produces about the same pollution per hour in a typical house as a thousand cigarettes burning.

Almost half of the world’s population cooks over inefficient open fires, causing devastation on forests and climate.

Up to seven hours per day and 50% of a family’s income can be spent on collecting firewood, thus perpetuating poverty.